Getting through the Q&A section of your presentation

Don't fear the Q&A... Embrace it!

Imagine being at a conference or meetup giving a talk. You completely ace it (I believe you will, even if you don’t, you badass!) but then you feel anxiety setting in. You can feel it coming for you, slowly, surely: the end of your talk. Which means… it’s time for Q&A: Questions and (hopefully) your Answers. Q&A is the most dreaded part of a presentation for some while being indispensable for others. [Read More]

Great stuff is Loom-ing on the Horizon for Java

A short look at Project Loom

Almost two years ago now, I was at Oracle Code One in San Francisco. It was there that I first heard about Project Loom, a project that would introduce some kind of new way to do concurreny in Java. At that point, Loom was just a concept, a promise to make concurrency in Java easier. Fast forward to today and Loom has changed quite a bit since that initial presentation. The time to catch up with Project Loom. [Read More]
Loom  Java  JDK 

Building a Twitch Chat Integrated Game

STOMP that IRC

Being in Corona isolation, I have been watching some Twitch streams and was wondering if it would be something I’d like to do as well. I love teaching and since we’re all pretty much stuck in our homes, maybe I should give it a shot. It could be kind of like giving a talk at a conference only more limited in interaction… but that’s what I love most about teaching…interaction. [Read More]

Statically spilling your (Spring) Beans

Accessing Spring Beans from a static method

There are some edge cases where you want to access Spring Beans in a static method. While you should always try to refactor your code so you do not have to do this… this post will still show you how it can be done. Continue reading at your own risk! You have been warned! Autowiring Beans Getting instances of beans in Spring is pretty simple. You add @Autowired on your constructor and assuming your class is a bean as well, an instance will be injected in your constructor. [Read More]

A plushy controlled game (Part 2)

Learning to fly with ml5.js and the Teachable Machine

This is part two of a series. Missed part 1? Read it here! What are we building? What do you get when you mix physics and computer vision? A demo concept “game” controlled by a plush animal! So fluffy! <3 In the first post we covered the basic elements of a game. We drew items on a canvas and programmed in some physics so our big friend can jump! [Read More]

A plushy controlled game (Part 1)

A journey into p5.js

I have been fascinated by video games ever since I saw the first level of Mario. They dominated a big part of my youth and are what got me into programming in the first place. Building a website for our Call of Duty clan was probably one of the first times I can into contact with HTML and CSS. Recently however, my fascination has shifted from playing games, to discovering how they are built. [Read More]

'Just Google It' is not enough

The negative impact of 3 simple words

When I had just transitioned into a senior role a couple of years ago, a junior developer in my team asked me a technical question. I was busy tackling a pretty important issue which required my full attention so I didn’t give him the time he deserved. Basically what I answered him was: “Just Google It…” Fast forward a couple of months. I am scrolling through Twitter and see an interesting discussion. [Read More]

Rekindling the Fire (Part 2)

Stressors and Boosters

Early september 2019, it finally happened. I had been ignoring the warning signs for years. Instead of pacing myself for the marathon which is a career, I sprinted, running ever faster, harder, better… only to fall on my face. I had burned out. As stated in the first post of this series, these are things which helped ME. This blog post is not a replacement for seeking professional help. [Read More]

Rekindling the Fire (Part 1)

Burnout: Looking the monster in the eye

Early september 2019, it finally happened. I had been ignoring the warning signs for years. Instead of pacing myself for the marathon which is a career, I sprinted, running ever faster, harder, better… only to fall on my face. I had burned out. That was 4 months ago and next week, I will rejoin my colleagues at work. As we reach this phase of my recovery, I want to take the time to list some of the things which helped me get back on top. [Read More]

Deploy on 'git push' at no cost for Github Private Repositories

A free deployment pipeline for continuous delivery.

Yes! A month ago, Github announced we can finally have free private repositories. I was very excited about this news. There are a few projects I would have prefered to keep private but I was too cheap to pay for the private repositories. Problem solved… Or is it? As soon as I made some repositories private I realized that making my repositories private came at a cost: NOBODY CAN SEE YOUR REPO (DHU! [Read More]